Phi Theta Kappa…PTK…or (in our case) Punch That Kid

posted in: Homeschooling, Large Family | 3

Enoch's Phi Theta Kappa induction.

This dashing young man was inducted into Phi Theta Kappa last night. Not only that, but he is the Co-President, like his brother before him.

Enoch's Phi Theta Kappa induction.

In our house, PTK also stands for Punch That Kid. You know, because of this.

And speaking on Punch That Kid…may I remind you that Enoch is the subject of the blog posts Raising Edison and Homeschooling Non-Traditional Students.

(If you haven’t read them yet, you should pause and go take a look now. Then share them with a friend who needs to read them.)

Enoch's Phi Theta Kappa induction.

Keep in mind that both “Edison” and “Non-Traditional Student” are euphemisms for I-Really-Want-To-Throat-Punch-This-Kid-Who-Won’t-Do-His-Darn-Schoolwork

Today? I never have to remind him to do his school work. He is driven, determined and self-motivated. All of that energy he spent trying to avoid work? He now puts into work.

Enoch's Phi Theta Kappa induction.

Homeschooling really is a grand experiment. My grandma was very concerned about the idea of us homeschooling our kids. Especially when we took a non-traditional, non-regimented approach.

I can remember my grandma having a serious talk with me when Adalia was six. We used the Montessori approach of having kids learn the letter sounds before the letter names. When we read her alphabet books we always called the letters by their sound rather than name.

“I just don’t understand,” my grandma said to me one day. “Any kindergartener can sing the alphabet song but Adalia is six and can’t!”

No, she couldn’t.

But she could read fluently (and now she can definitely sing the alphabet song).

Enoch's Phi Theta Kappa Induction.

And now all, all of my children can read.

And better than that? They all love to read, which is arguably more important.

Enoch's Phi Theta Kappa induction.

I suppose a part of me will always be sad that I didn’t get to homeschool all of my children, all the way through. It has been such a fun, amazing, inspiring, challenging and (finally) rewarding experience for everyone.

Enoch has one more year of community college (and high school) ahead of him and then it is on to bigger and better things. For now, I am enjoying these teen years and am every so grateful that no one was punched last night.

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3 Responses

  1. Thanks for reposting those links. I needed to read those posts.

    I have a son like Enoch was and you’ve rekindled my hope that someday, somehow I can educate him. My boy (6 years old) is curious, smart and interested in the things around him…all except school. He loves to “borrow” his dad’s tools and fasteners and build fantastic creations of dubious usefulness out of scraps. He loves disassembling things to see how they work, then trying to put them back together correctly. He loves Lego, and get this…he loves cleaning and organizing around the house, but only when the spirit moves him. And you better believe it never moves him when I *ask* him to clean something. He can read, slowly and hesitantly, and lessons often bring both of us to tears. He grasps math easily and does it well, but he vastly prefers to sneak off, need to poop, or stubbornly refuse to touch his pencil. After an hour or so, he picks up the pencil and completes the page in minutes. *sigh* It’s been a tough, tough school year with him and I am already dreading next year. It helped me to read what you wrote about Enoch. Sometimes I get so caught up in the boy he is now that I forget that someday he’ll grow up, and probably outgrow many of these issues.

  2. Your kids are all so cute!

  3. Not to steal Enoch’s thunder, but I’m looking at some of them jumping around,and gee, they are graceful. Apollo’s in second position (ballet) almost, and have you considered putting him in a ballet class? It’d be good for his health and I think he could do it. . . .

Please share your thoughts!